BOOK BIRTHDAY: Telling the Map by Christopher Rowe

I met Christopher Rowe over 20 years ago at Clarion West, where I read his uniquely Southern take on speculative fiction. His work combines SFnal tropes with the rich culture of the American South, creating something inexplicably weird and eerily familiar. If Eudora Welty wrote SF, it might look like this….

Anyway, check out his debut collection, TELLING THE MAP.

Rowe Book

 

Happy Book Birthday: The Art of Starving by Sam J. Miller

Today is the release day for The Art of Starving by Sam J. Miller. I haven’t read it yet, but I met Sam last summer at a workshop and read the first draft of his 2018 novel BLACKFISH CITY and can vouch for his mad fictioneerin’ skillz.

The Art of Starving sounds intriguing: magic, queer identity, and eating disorders. It’s available at the usual suspects.

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BOOK RECOMMENDATION:Legenda Maris by Tanith Lee

Today is Tanith Lee‘s funeral.

Per the request of her husband John Kaiine, her collection ‘Legenda Maris’ (Immanion Press) is released this day.

‘Legenda Maris’ collects Lee’s sea-themed fantasy short fiction, and is an excellent introduction to her darkly lyrical work. It includes some of the first fiction I read by her: the excellent ‘Because Our Skins Are Finer‘ and ‘Magritte’s Secret Agent.’ An added bonus is the artwork–the cover and the frontispiece are by Tanith herself.

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Liturgy of Ice (A Variation) now available! A dark homoerotic fairytale

Liturgy of Ice was inspired by one of my favorite fairytales, The Snow Queen. I use the fairytale imagery as a mediation isolation and loneliness.

Other inspirations: “The Sweetest Chill,” by Siouxsie & the Banshees; Philip Ridley’s novel In the Eyes of Mr. Fury.

It’s on Kindle here.

And the Kobo here.

It’s also on the Scribd platform as well: here.

 

Death’s Master (Flat Earth Book 2) by Tanith Lee is now an ebook. Wildean fantasia meets Arabian Nights

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Death’s Master is finally an ebook, released by Immanion Press. It’s an epic fantasy told in the high style full of eroticism and horror, as well as beauty. Part runaway Wildean fantasia, part Arabian Nights, here’s what I said about the Flat Earth series as a whole:

The eroticism in the text [is] exploratory but tempered by a peculiar kind of innocence, helped in no small part by the jewel-like precision of the prose.  There [are] horrors in the stories, but there [is] also tenderness.  It is [Tanith] Lee’s special talent to mix both tenderness and terror.