Neon Hemlock and Baffling Magazine

I will be co-editing Baffling Magazine, a new flash fiction venue that specializes in Weird Fiction with a queer bent, alongside dave ring, who runs the Neon Hemlock micropress. (“Weird Fiction” isn’t strictly Lovecraftian/cosmic horror here; it includes the new fabulism of Kelly Link and Jeffrey Ford).

A submission announcement will go up soon. In the meantime, you can check out the mostly skeletal website here.

https://www.bafflingmag.com/

Speaking of Neon Hemlock, they are also running a chapbook contest (poetry/fiction/nonfiction categories) for the OutWrite Literary Festival, which happens every summer. It is only opened to writers in the DVM (District-Virginia-Maryland) area and has some awesome judges.

https://www.neonhemlock.com/news/submissions-opem-to-2020-outwrite-chapbook-competition

Finally, I will be reading some fiction on Neon Hemlock’s Instagram feed on June 17, along side Eboni Dunbar and Suzan Palumbo. More info —

https://www.facebook.com/events/536502893678102/

The Michael Bukowski Bestiary

I’ve long admired the work of artist Michael Bukowski and his unique take on the creatures that dwell in the annals of Weird Fiction. In addition to illustrating the creatures of the Lovecraftian Mythos, he’s also tackled the work of more contemporary writers, such as Nnedi Okorafor and Ursula LeGuin.

He’s gone ahead and rendered a portrait of the Grey Boy in The Nectar of Nightmares!

I’m so honored!

You can check out more of his work here and on his Instagram!

Book Birthday: Nowhereville, ed by Scott Gable and C. Dombrowski (Broken Eye Books)

Happy Book Birthday to Nowhereville: Weird is Other People. Gable and Dombrowski have amassed a whole lot of talent for this anthology of contemporary Weird Fiction.

From the back cover copy: Nowhereville: Weird Is Other People is an anthology of urban weird fiction. These are stories of the city, of people interacting with the complexities that are other people. These 19 short stories explore the genre of weird fiction, tales not quite fantasy and not quite science fiction, tales blurring the lines between genres. These are the strange stories of the strange decisions we make and the strange ways the city affects us.

Authors include: Nuzo Onoh, Maura McHugh, P. Djèlí Clark, Evan J. Peterson, S.P. Miskowski, Lynda E. Rucker, Tariro Ndoro, D.A. Xiaolin Spires, Mike Allen, Jeffrey Thomas, Erica L. Satifka, Kathe Koja, Leah Bobet, Ramsey Campbell, Wole Talabi, Stephen Graham Jones, R.B. Lemberg, Cody Goodfellow

It’s also been getting some stellar reviews!

“Taken together, these stories create an uncanny, unpredictable hall of mirrors. These wonderfully strange takes on modern living are sure to resonate with fans of speculative fiction.” (STARRED review from Publishers Weekly, and a PW Book of the Week)

“Readers will be enchanted by this collection and eagerly anticipate what the next entry will bring. The stories here are disconcerting, ambiguous, and sometimes confusing—but always intriguing and genre-bending, digging into the ways we connect to those around us.” (Booklist)

“What’s more, they complement one another in a way that’s rare even for collections by single authors, much less an anthology delivering 19 disparate voices. Indeed, the effect of this collection is not so much that of a set of loosely comparable episodes but of a kaleidoscope: variegated and multifaceted yet all of a piece. Remarkably powerful urban tales, each one brilliantly in harmony with the others.” (STARRED review from Kirkus)

My piece, called “Underglaze,” takes its inspiration from the Flow Blue plates my late aunt Evelyn collected.

LINK: Outer Dark Symposium panel ‘No Man’s Tale: Female, Binary & Queer Bodies in a Weird Space’,

In this podcast The Outer Dark presents the fourth installment of The Outer Dark Symposium on the Greater Weird 2019 including  the panel: ‘No Man’s Tale: Female, Binary & Queer Bodies in a Weird Space’, moderated by Larissa Glasser and featuring Laura BlackwellCraig Laurance GidneySunny Moraineteri.zin/Zin E. Rocklyn, and Damien Angelica Walters, as well as readings by Jesse BullingtonKyoko M, and John Foster, and an introductory interview with Larissa Glasser. The readings and panel were recorded live on Saturday March 23 at Silver Scream FX Lab in Atlanta, GA. Larissa’s interview was recorded on Sept. 29 and News from The Weird on Sept. 30.

Listen to the podcast here.

Dead Astronauts by Jeff VanderMeer (NetGalley review). Visionary Weirdness.

I suspect that a great many readers will not appreciate the dense language and the non-linear structure a this loose prequel to Borne. Borne, for all of its hallucinogenic qualities, has a fairly straight forward plot that could be turned into a film, albeit one by Jodorowsky. Dead Astronauts, though, revels in its textuality. It can’t be filmed. Though it’s an ecological science fiction novel that plays with theoretical concepts like Time Travel and parallel Earths, it operates with dream logic. Vandermeer plays games with typography (though not in a House of Leaves way; it’s more like the beginning of Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye with its use of repetition and claustrophobic line spacing) that underscore the surrealistic nature of book. The novel—prose poem?— is closer tone to Delany’s DHALGREN or even Lautremont’s Le Chants de Maldoror. This kind of visionary writing—full of beautiful nightmarish imagery—is one of my favorite forms of fiction. I hope it finds the right audience. 

Necronomicon 2019/ Wikipedia Page

I had a great time at Necronomicon in Providence, Rhode Island this past weekend. I caught up with old friends, and met new ones and did my best not to break the bank with all of the various artwork in the dealer’s room. While I am not particularly a Lovecraft fan, I am huge fan for Weird Fiction itself–both contemporary and historic.

I was on two panels this year. Both of them were recorded for the Outer Dark podcast, and should be up in the near future.

The Tanith Lee panel explored Lee’s criminally underrated idiosyncratic fiction, its eroticism, humor, and lush decadence. I learned more facts about Lee the person from Allison Rich, who runs the online bibliography Daughter of the Night: An Annotated Tanith Lee Bibliography.

Paul Di Fillipo, Thomas Broadbent, Allison Rich, me, Sonya Taafe, Daniel Braum

The Weird Fiction in the African Diaspora was equally illuminating–my fellow panelists offered a plethora of passionate viewpoints. We talked about how the various tropes of Cosmic Horror are transformed through a black/African-descended lens.

Hysop Mulero, Victor LaValle, me, Chesya Burke, Errick Nunnally, teri zin

Both panels were well-attended.

I managed to sell out of the books that I brought with me, and signed a shipment that arrived at the Lovecraft Arts and Sciences store.


I came home to find that now have a Wikipedia entry, thanks to friends who are editors.

Forthcoming Story in Broken Eye Books Anthology.

My story “Underglaze” is in the forthcoming anthology Nowhereville: Weird is Other People — Tale of the Urban Weird (Broken Eye Books; TBD). Editors Scott Gable & C. Dombrowski have assembled a top-notch roster of artists, including Maura McHugh, S.P. Miskowski, Ramsey Campbell, Kathe Koja, Erica L. Satifka, Nuzo Onoh, Lynda E. Rucker, P. Djèlí Clark, Cody Goodfellow, Wole Talabi, Stephen Graham Jones, Mike Allen, Jeffrey Thomas, R.B. Lemberg, Evan Peterson, and more.

In the meantime, feast your eyes on this cover!

An eeriness of weird fiction enthusiasts: The Outer Dark Symposium on the Greater Weird 2019

The third annual Outer Dark Symposium on the Greater Weird occurred last weekend. It was a confluence of readings, panels, and academic presentations all held in a special effects studio in Atlanta, under the watchful gaze of silicon monsters. Attendees came from all parts of the country, as far away as Hawaii. The readings spanned the entire cosmos of Weird Fiction, from the absurd to creepy to literary and all points in-between. The lively panels were full of passionate participants.

I have no idea where my own fiction fits in this constellation but it definitely has a home, embedded there amongst the other dark stars. In fact, I pitched A SPECTRAL HUE at last year’s symposium (check the acknowledgements of the book). Thanks to everyone who had a hand in organizing this event.

Till next year!

A few of the other attendees (Silver Scream FX Lab)